The Gods in Twilight

Copyright (c) Matthew Wright 2017

An alien experiment gone wrong: a paleo-world shrouded in ice, where even the gods bend before the power of the mages. Warfare. Suffering. Pain. Heroes. Five thousand years of history from the age of sorcery to the world of clockwork steam.

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Read the first novella from the cycle in the second Endless Worlds compilation, available in Kindle and paperback. While trying to rescue his parents from the clutches of city Enforcers, a young soldier finds himself trapped in a war of ancient powers – and has to find the strength in himself to make a terrible choice.

The Gods in Twilight cycle riffs on the roots of western culture and reflects my take on the human condition. I’ve been playing with the concept for years, but it’s only come together in the last while. If the name sounds a bit, well, Wagnerish, that’s because it calls out sources such as the Volsung saga. However, the concept is one I concocted. The stories are about the idea that humans, fundamentally, find it easier to be evil than good – which opens up a lot of mythologic-scale character arcs and story options (especially redemption).

Is that really how humans are? Are we damaged, psychopathic apes who repeatedly fall into a crapsack dystopia because we can’t think differently? Sometimes I think so. But the essence of my stories is the moral warning – portraying that ‘ease of evil’ – self-gratification, greed, bullying, leading to dysfunctional societies – and highlighting the struggle of the heroes in each story as they try to overcome the evil around them.

Are the heroes I draw good? When we look around at the world in general, it’s a relative term. Complex, grey-shaded, believing in their own goodness and in the rightness of what they’re doing. Ultimately, of course, people fall over their own ordinariness. But isn’t that how it always goes?